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NEW EU FOOD LABELLING RULES from 13th December 2014

Published on December 18, 2014 by in blog, slider

Food: EU consumers to benefit from better labelling as of 13 December 2014

As of 13 December 2014, new EU food labelling[1] rules, adopted by the European Parliament and the Council in 2011, will ensure that consumers receive clearer, more comprehensive and accurate information on food content, and help them make informed choices about what they eat.

The EU Commissioner in charge of Health and Food Safety, Vytenis Andriukaitis said: “As of 13 December 2014, European citizens will see the results of years of work to improve food labelling rules. Key content information will now be more clearly marked on labels, helping people make informed choices on the food they buy. The new rules put the consumer first by providing clearer information, and in a way that is manageable for businesses.”

Key changes

Some of the key changes to the labelling rules are outlined below:

  • Improved legibility of information (minimum font size for mandatory information);
  • Clearer and harmonised presentation of allergens (e.g. soy, nuts, gluten, lactose) for prepacked foods (emphasis by font, style or background colour) in the list of ingredients;
  • Mandatory allergen information for non-prepacked food, including in restaurants and cafes;
  • Requirement of certain nutrition information for majority of prepacked processed foods;
  • Mandatory origin information for fresh meat from pigs, sheep, goats and poultry;
  • Same labelling requirements for online, distance-selling or buying in a shop;
  • List of engineered nanomaterials in the ingredients.
  • Specific information on the vegetable origin of refined oils and fats;
  • Strengthened rules to prevent misleading practices;
  • Indication of substitute ingredient for ‘Imitation’ foods;
  • Clear indication of “formed meat” or “formed fish”; and
  • Clear indication of defrosted products.

However, rules relating to mandatory nutritional labelling for processed food will only apply from 13 December 2016.

Food business operators have been given three years to ensure a smooth transition towards the new labelling regime for prepacked and non-prepacked foods. In addition, the Regulation provides for exhaustion of stocks for foods placed on the market or labelled before 13 December 2014 (N.B. this does not include exhaustion of stocks of labels).

The Commission has been working together with businesses to ensure that the new rules will be properly implemented. Work is also underway on developing an EU database to facilitate the identification of all EU and national mandatory labelling rules in a simple way. This will offer a user-friendly tool for all food business operators and for SME’s to consult. The work for the creation of the database should be carried out during 2015.

Background

Regulation (EU) No 1169/2011 on the provision of information to consumers replaces and combines into one piece of legislation previous labelling rules deriving from Directive 2000/13/EC regarding labelling, presentation and advertising of foodstuffs and Directive 90/496/EEC on nutrition labelling of foodstuffs and other legislative acts for specific categories of foods.

For more information

MEMO/14/2561

http://ec.europa.eu/food/food/labellingnutrition/foodlabelling/index_en.htm

http://ec.europa.eu/fisheries/documentation/publications/eu-new-fish-and-aquaculture-consumer-labels-pocket-guide_en.pdf

Follow us on Twitter:@Food_EU

 

[1]Regulation (EU) No 1169/2011

 
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A Carol A Day – “We Wish You a Merry Christmas”

Published on December 17, 2014 by in blog

A few facts about  Christmas carols

“We Wish You a Merry Christmas”

“We Wish You a Merry Christmas” is a popular sixteenth-century English carol from the West Country of England. The author/composer cannot be traced.  The origin of this Christmas carol lies in the English tradition whereby wealthy people of the community gave Christmas treats to the carolers on Christmas Eve, such as figgy puddings that were very much like modern-day Christmas puddings. For the curious, the recipe consisted of the most important ingredient which was of course figs together with butter, sugar, eggs, milk, rum, apple, lemon and orange peel, nuts, cinnamon, cloves and ginger! Not dissimilar to the modern day Christmas Puddings! It is one of the few English traditional carols that makes mention of the New Year celebration.

17th Dec 2014 – Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!

Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!
Wednesday 17 December
3.00 – 6.00pm
Central Library, The Atrium
Seasonal songs, poems and tales for all the family, craft stalls and free refreshments for all who join in!
Enjoy the Leeds Frozen in Time Exhibition.
Adults and families welcome.
Free event, No booking required.

For more information call 0113 247 6016
or visit www.leeds.gov.uk/libraries
@leedslibraries

Central Library’s Winter Festival

There’s something for everyone in the run up to Christmas along with a festive selection of brand new festive books to borrow.

The full list of events is below, but we will be posting each event individually so keep your eyes peeled and be sure to follow us on Twitter @leedslibraries

https://www.facebook.com/leedslibraries/photos/a.158043964207.116597.119146154207/10152943373909208/?type=1&theater

 

Sources :

www.niu.edu

http://www.carols.org.uk

www.aboutgerman.net

www.german-way.com

http://www.theatlantic.com

www.thetelegraph.co.uk

http://en.wikipedia.org

www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com

 
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A Carol A Day – “The Holly and the Ivy”

Published on December 16, 2014 by in blog

A few facts about  Christmas carols

“The Holly and the Ivy”

“The Holly and the Ivy” is a traditional British Christmas carol. Holly and ivy have been a mainstay of British Christmas decoration for church use since at least the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, when they were mentioned regularly in churchwardens’ accounts.  The music and most of the text was first published by Cecil Sharp (1859–1924). Sir Henry Walford Davies wrote a popular choral arrangement in 1913 that is often performed at the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols and by choirs around the world. European Holly was sacred to druids who associated it with the winter solstice, and for Romans, holly was considered the plant of Saturn. European Holly has always traditionally had a strong association with Christmas. In ancient British village life there was a midwinter custom of holding singing-contests between men and women, where the men sang carols praising holly (for its “masculine” qualities) and disparaging ivy, while women sang songs praising the ivy (for its “feminine” qualities) and disparaging holly. The resolution between the two was under the mistletoe.

17th Dec 2014 – Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!

Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!
Wednesday 17 December
3.00 – 6.00pm
Central Library, The Atrium
Seasonal songs, poems and tales for all the family, craft stalls and free refreshments for all who join in!
Enjoy the Leeds Frozen in Time Exhibition.
Adults and families welcome.
Free event, No booking required.

For more information call 0113 247 6016
or visit www.leeds.gov.uk/libraries
@leedslibraries

Central Library’s Winter Festival

There’s something for everyone in the run up to Christmas along with a festive selection of brand new festive books to borrow.

The full list of events is below, but we will be posting each event individually so keep your eyes peeled and be sure to follow us on Twitter @leedslibraries

https://www.facebook.com/leedslibraries/photos/a.158043964207.116597.119146154207/10152943373909208/?type=1&theater

 

Sources :

www.niu.edu

http://www.carols.org.uk

www.aboutgerman.net

www.german-way.com

http://www.theatlantic.com

www.thetelegraph.co.uk

http://en.wikipedia.org

www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com

 
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A Carol A Day – “Jingle Bells”

Published on December 15, 2014 by in blog

A few facts about  Christmas carols

“Jingle Bells”

“Jingle Bells” is one of the best-known and commonly sung American Christmas songs in the world. It was written by James Lord Pierpont (1822–1893) and published under the title “One Horse Open Sleigh” in the autumn of 1857. Even though it is now associated with the Christmas and holiday season, it was actually originally written to be sung for American Thanksgiving. “Jingle Bells” was often used as a drinking song at parties: people would jingle the ice in their glasses as they sung. The double-meaning of “upsot” was thought humorous, and a sleigh ride gave an unescorted couple a rare chance to be together, unchaperoned, in distant woods or fields, with all the opportunities that afforded. Sleigh rides were the nineteenth-century equivalent of taking a girl to a drive-in movie theatre in the 1950s and early 1960s, so there was a somewhat suggestive and scintillating aspect to the song that is often now unrecognised.. The Singing Dogs created in Denmark in the early 1950s by a self-taught ornithologist and released in the U.S. in 1955 marks a turning point in how we listen to music but became one of the most hated Christmas song in 2007.

17th Dec 2014 – Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!

Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!
Wednesday 17 December
3.00 – 6.00pm
Central Library, The Atrium
Seasonal songs, poems and tales for all the family, craft stalls and free refreshments for all who join in!
Enjoy the Leeds Frozen in Time Exhibition.
Adults and families welcome.
Free event, No booking required.

For more information call 0113 247 6016
or visit www.leeds.gov.uk/libraries
@leedslibraries

Central Library’s Winter Festival

There’s something for everyone in the run up to Christmas along with a festive selection of brand new festive books to borrow.

The full list of events is below, but we will be posting each event individually so keep your eyes peeled and be sure to follow us on Twitter @leedslibraries

https://www.facebook.com/leedslibraries/photos/a.158043964207.116597.119146154207/10152943373909208/?type=1&theater

 

Sources :

www.niu.edu

http://www.carols.org.uk

www.aboutgerman.net

www.german-way.com

http://www.theatlantic.com

www.thetelegraph.co.uk

http://en.wikipedia.org

www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com

 
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A Carol A Day – “Silent Night”

Published on December 14, 2014 by in blog

A few facts about  Christmas carols

“Silent Night”

“Silent Night” (German: Stille Nacht, heilige Nacht) is a popular Christmas carol, composed in 1818 by Franz Xaver Gruber to lyrics by Joseph Mohr in the small town of Oberndorf bei Salzburg, Austria. In 1859, the Episcopal priest John Freeman Young, then serving at Trinity Church, New York City, published the English translation that is most frequently sung today. The version of the melody that is generally used today is a slow, meditative lullaby, differing slightly (particularly in the final strain) from Gruber’s original, which was a sprightly, dance-like tune in 6/8 time. Today, the lyrics and melody are in the public domain. It was declared an intangible cultural heritage by UNESCO in March 2011. The song has been recorded by a large number of singers from every music genre. The carol has been translated into about 140 languages. The song was sung simultaneously in French, English and German by troops during the Christmas truce of 1914 during World War I, as it was one carol that soldiers on both sides of the front line knew.

17th Dec 2014 – Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!

Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!
Wednesday 17 December
3.00 – 6.00pm
Central Library, The Atrium
Seasonal songs, poems and tales for all the family, craft stalls and free refreshments for all who join in!
Enjoy the Leeds Frozen in Time Exhibition.
Adults and families welcome.
Free event, No booking required.

For more information call 0113 247 6016
or visit www.leeds.gov.uk/libraries
@leedslibraries

Central Library’s Winter Festival

There’s something for everyone in the run up to Christmas along with a festive selection of brand new festive books to borrow.

The full list of events is below, but we will be posting each event individually so keep your eyes peeled and be sure to follow us on Twitter @leedslibraries

https://www.facebook.com/leedslibraries/photos/a.158043964207.116597.119146154207/10152943373909208/?type=1&theater

 

Sources :

www.niu.edu

http://www.carols.org.uk

www.aboutgerman.net

www.german-way.com

http://www.theatlantic.com

www.thetelegraph.co.uk

http://en.wikipedia.org

www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com

 
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A Carol A Day – “O Christmas Tree”

Published on December 13, 2014 by in blog

A few facts about  Christmas carols

O Christmas Tree

“O Tannenbaum” (“O Christmas Tree”) is a German Christmas song. Based on a traditional folk song, it became associated with the Christmas tree by the early 20th century and sung as a Christmas carol. The modern lyrics were written in 1824 by the Leipzig organist, teacher and composer Ernst Anschütz.  A Tannenbaum is a fir tree. The lyrics do not actually refer to Christmas nor describe a decorated Christmas tree. Instead, they refer to the fir’s evergreen qualities as a symbol of constancy and faithfulness. In 1819 Joachim August Zarnack wrote a tragic love song inspired by this folk song, taking the evergreen, “faithful” fir tree as contrasting with a faithless lover. The custom of the Christmas tree developed in the course of the 19th century, and the song came to be seen as a Christmas carol. Anschütz’s version still had treu (true, faithful) as the adjective describing the fir’s leaves (needles), harking back to the contrast to the faithless maiden of the folk song. This was changed to grün (green) at some point in the 20th century, after the song had come to be associated with Christmas.

The tune has also been used to carry other texts on many occasions. Some notable uses include: The Red Flag, official state song for three US states and schoolchildren in Sweden use to sing “En busschaufför” (our bus driver) to the tune O Tannenbaum .

17th Dec 2014 – Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!

Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!
Wednesday 17 December
3.00 – 6.00pm
Central Library, The Atrium
Seasonal songs, poems and tales for all the family, craft stalls and free refreshments for all who join in!
Enjoy the Leeds Frozen in Time Exhibition.
Adults and families welcome.
Free event, No booking required.

For more information call 0113 247 6016
or visit www.leeds.gov.uk/libraries
@leedslibraries

Central Library’s Winter Festival

There’s something for everyone in the run up to Christmas along with a festive selection of brand new festive books to borrow.

The full list of events is below, but we will be posting each event individually so keep your eyes peeled and be sure to follow us on Twitter @leedslibraries

https://www.facebook.com/leedslibraries/photos/a.158043964207.116597.119146154207/10152943373909208/?type=1&theater

 

Sources :

www.niu.edu

http://www.carols.org.uk

www.aboutgerman.net

www.german-way.com

http://www.theatlantic.com

www.thetelegraph.co.uk

http://en.wikipedia.org

www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com

 
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A Carol A Day – “O Little Town of Bethlehem”

Published on December 12, 2014 by in blog

A few facts about  Christmas carols

O Little Town of Bethlehem

O Little Town of Bethlehem is a popular Christmas carol. The text was written in 1868 by Phillips Brooks (1835–1893), an Episcopal priest from Philadelphia. He was inspired by visiting the Palestinian city of Bethlehem in 1865. His organist, Lewis Redner, added the music. This tune was adapted into a hymn tune by Ralph Vaughan Williams from an English folk ballad called “The Ploughboy’s Dream”. It was first published in the English Hymnal of 1906.

17th Dec 2014 – Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!

Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!
Wednesday 17 December
3.00 – 6.00pm
Central Library, The Atrium
Seasonal songs, poems and tales for all the family, craft stalls and free refreshments for all who join in!
Enjoy the Leeds Frozen in Time Exhibition.
Adults and families welcome.
Free event, No booking required.

For more information call 0113 247 6016
or visit www.leeds.gov.uk/libraries
@leedslibraries

Central Library’s Winter Festival

There’s something for everyone in the run up to Christmas along with a festive selection of brand new festive books to borrow.

The full list of events is below, but we will be posting each event individually so keep your eyes peeled and be sure to follow us on Twitter @leedslibraries

https://www.facebook.com/leedslibraries/photos/a.158043964207.116597.119146154207/10152943373909208/?type=1&theater

 

Sources :

www.niu.edu

http://www.carols.org.uk

www.aboutgerman.net

www.german-way.com

http://www.theatlantic.com

www.thetelegraph.co.uk

http://en.wikipedia.org

www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com

 
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A Carol A Day – “Good King Wenceslas”

Published on December 11, 2014 by in blog

A few facts about  Christmas carols

“Good King Wenceslas”

“Good King Wenceslas” tells a story of a king braving harsh winter weather to give alms to a poor peasant on the Feast of Stephan (December 26). During the journey, his page is about to give up the struggle against the cold weather, but is enabled to continue by following the king’s footprints through the deep snow. The legend is based on the life of the historical Czech Saint Wenceslaus I, (907–935). Several centuries later the legend was claimed as fact by Pope Pius II, who himself also walked ten miles barefoot in the ice and snow as an act of pious thanksgiving. In 1853, English hymn writer John Mason Neale wrote the “Wenceslas” lyrics, in collaboration with his music editor Thomas Helmor. The lyrics were set to a tune based on a 13th-century spring carol. Elizabeth Poston (musician) referred to it as the “product of an unnatural marriage between Victorian whimsy and the thirteenth-century dance carol”, adding Neale’s “ponderous moral doggerel” does not fit the light-hearted dance measure of the original tune, and that if performed in the correct manner “sounds ridiculous to pseudo-religious words”.

17th Dec 2014 – Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!

Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!
Wednesday 17 December
3.00 – 6.00pm
Central Library, The Atrium
Seasonal songs, poems and tales for all the family, craft stalls and free refreshments for all who join in!
Enjoy the Leeds Frozen in Time Exhibition.
Adults and families welcome.
Free event, No booking required.

For more information call 0113 247 6016
or visit www.leeds.gov.uk/libraries
@leedslibraries

Central Library’s Winter Festival

There’s something for everyone in the run up to Christmas along with a festive selection of brand new festive books to borrow.

The full list of events is below, but we will be posting each event individually so keep your eyes peeled and be sure to follow us on Twitter @leedslibraries

https://www.facebook.com/leedslibraries/photos/a.158043964207.116597.119146154207/10152943373909208/?type=1&theater

 

Sources :

www.niu.edu

http://www.carols.org.uk

www.aboutgerman.net

www.german-way.com

http://www.theatlantic.com

www.thetelegraph.co.uk

http://en.wikipedia.org

www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com

 
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A Carol A Day – “O Come All Ye Faithful”

Published on December 10, 2014 by in blog

 A few facts about  Christmas carols

“O Come All Ye Faithful”

The text to the Carol “O Come All Ye Faithful” was originally written in Latin (Adeste Fideles) and was intended to be a hymn. It is attributed to John Wade, an Englishman. Wade fled to France after the Jacobite rising of 1745 was crushed. As a Catholic layman, he lived with exiled English Catholics in France for the rest of his life. The music was composed by John Reading in the early 1700s. The tune was first published in a collection known as “Cantus Diversi” in 1751. In 1841 Rev. Frederick Oakley is reputed to have worked on the familiar translation of O Come All Ye Faithful which replaced the older Latin lyrics “Adeste Fideles”.

17th Dec 2014 – Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!

Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!
Wednesday 17 December
3.00 – 6.00pm
Central Library, The Atrium
Seasonal songs, poems and tales for all the family, craft stalls and free refreshments for all who join in!
Enjoy the Leeds Frozen in Time Exhibition.
Adults and families welcome.
Free event, No booking required.

For more information call 0113 247 6016
or visit www.leeds.gov.uk/libraries
@leedslibraries

Central Library’s Winter Festival

There’s something for everyone in the run up to Christmas along with a festive selection of brand new festive books to borrow.

The full list of events is below, but we will be posting each event individually so keep your eyes peeled and be sure to follow us on Twitter @leedslibraries

https://www.facebook.com/leedslibraries/photos/a.158043964207.116597.119146154207/10152943373909208/?type=1&theater

Sources :

www.niu.edu

http://www.carols.org.uk

www.aboutgerman.net

www.german-way.com

http://www.theatlantic.com

www.thetelegraph.co.uk

http://en.wikipedia.org

www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com

 
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No Comments  comments 
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A Carol A Day – “The First Noel”

Published on December 9, 2014 by in blog

A few facts about  Christmas carols

“The First Noel”

“The First Noel” (also written “The First Noël” and “The First Nowell”) is a traditional classical English carol, most likely from the 18th century, although possibly earlier. The word Noel comes from the French word Noël meaning Christmas, from the Latin word “natalis” which translates as ” birthday”. In its current form, it is of Cornish origin, and it was first published in 1823.The melody is unusual among English folk melodies in that it consists of one musical phrase repeated twice, followed by a refrain which is a variation on that phrase.

 

 

17th Dec 2014 – Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!

Central Library’s Christmas Cracker!
Wednesday 17 December
3.00 – 6.00pm
Central Library, The Atrium
Seasonal songs, poems and tales for all the family, craft stalls and free refreshments for all who join in!
Enjoy the Leeds Frozen in Time Exhibition.
Adults and families welcome.
Free event, No booking required.

For more information call 0113 247 6016
or visit www.leeds.gov.uk/libraries
@leedslibraries

Central Library’s Winter Festival

There’s something for everyone in the run up to Christmas along with a festive selection of brand new festive books to borrow.

The full list of events is below, but we will be posting each event individually so keep your eyes peeled and be sure to follow us on Twitter @leedslibraries

https://www.facebook.com/leedslibraries/photos/a.158043964207.116597.119146154207/10152943373909208/?type=1&theater

 

Sources :

www.niu.edu

http://www.carols.org.uk

www.aboutgerman.net

www.german-way.com

http://www.theatlantic.com

www.thetelegraph.co.uk

http://en.wikipedia.org

www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com

 
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